Accessory Navicular Problems Treatment Overview
The accessory navicular (os navicularum or os tibiale externum) is an extra bone or piece of cartilage located on the inner side of the foot just above the arch. It is incorporated within the posterior tibial tendon, which attaches in this area. An accessory navicular is congenital (present at birth). It is not part of normal bone structure and therefore is not present in most people.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
This painful foot condition is caused by an extra bone in the foot called the accessory navicular. Only about 10% of people have this bone (4 to 21%), and not all of them will develop any symptoms. The navicular bone is one of the normal tarsal bones of the foot. It is located on the inside of the foot, at the arch.

Symptoms
A visible bony lump on the inner part of the foot, towards the middle, just above the arch of the foot. Redness, swelling, and sensitivity of the bony prominence. Pain or throbbing in the middle of the foot and the arch. Difficulty with foot movement and activity. Possible skin callous or skin irritation caused by footwear rubbing over the lump. Not everyone who has an accessory navicular will develop these problems. When problems do occur, they may begin in early adolescence. The obvious indication is a painful bump on the inside of the foot, which hurts to touch, and causes problems that gradually become worse, and which are aggravated by activity, walking, etc., leading to all the problems discussed here. Pain may be worse towards the end of the day, and continue into the night.

Diagnosis
Typically, accessory navicular syndrome isn?t hard to diagnose. Our podiatrists will examine the lower limb and check the hard prominence, as well as use X-rays to confirm the presence of extra bone tissue. Other diagnostic images may be able to identify inflammation and specific damage to the midfoot. Depending on the severity of your discomfort, conservative measures may be enough to resolve the condition.

Non Surgical Treatment
For less severe symptoms, decreasing or modifying activity, such as avoiding aggravating activities, may suffice. Ice and NSAIDS can be used to help control pain. An arch support or an orthotics may help to stabilize the arch during this time. When rubbing on the bump causes pain, a doughnut pad Can you lose weight by doing yoga? be worn. Exercises to increase range of motion and improve movement should still be used.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
The original procedure advocated by Kidner involved shelling out of the accessory navicular bone from within the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon and rerouting this tendon under the navicular bone in hopes of restoring a normal pull of this tendon. When treating younger children, history has shown us that simply shelling out of the accessory navicular bone from within the tendon and remodeling the tuberosity of the navicular bone can give you satisfactory results.
In general, you want to reserve advancement of the posterior tibial tendon for adults or those who have a more significant flatfoot deformity. You may also use this approach after determining that quality custom orthotics are only resulting in a slight decrease of symptoms.

What Causes Heel Discomfort Overview
Heel Discomfort
Does it feel like you have a nail in your heel? After walking for a few minutes does the pain slowly disappear? Millions of people each year are faced with this type of pain. While there may be other causes, the most common is Plantar Fasciitis. Plantar Faciitis is an inflammation of the fibrous tissue, called the plantar fasciia, that runs along the bottom of your foot that connects the heel (calcaneus) to the toes (metatarsals). Treatment for this condition How can you get taller in a week? take many forms including: stretching exercises, drugs, orthotics, injections, and in rare cases surgical procedures. Until now the treatment methods have addressed the active conscious periods only to be undone when a person goes to bed or sits in the easy chair relaxing.

Causes
Common causes of heel pain include Achilles tendinitis, Achilles tendon rupture, Bone tumor, Bursitis, Fibromyalgia, Fracture, Gout, Heel pad wear and tear, Heel spur, Osteomyelitis, Peripheral neuropathy, Pinched nerve, Plantar fasciitis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Stress fractures, Tarsal tunnel syndrome, Tendinitis. Causes shown here are commonly associated with this symptom. Work with your doctor or other health care professional for an accurate diagnosis.

Symptoms
The symptoms of plantar fasciitis include pain along the inside edge of the heel near the arch of the foot. The pain is worse when weight is placed on the foot especially after a long period of rest or inactivity. This is usually most pronounced in the morning when the foot is first placed on the floor. This symptom called first-step pain is typical of plantar fasciitis. Prolonged standing can also increase the painful symptoms. It may feel better after activity but most patients report increased pain by the end of the day. Pressing on this part of the heel causes tenderness. Pulling the toes back toward the face can be very painful.

Diagnosis
The diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is generally made during the history and physical examination. There are several conditions that can cause heel pain, and plantar fasciitis must be distinguished from these conditions. Pain can be referred to the heel and foot from other areas of the body such as the low back, hip, knee, and/or ankle. Special tests to challenge these areas are performed to help confirm the problem is truly coming from the plantar fascia. An X-ray may be ordered to rule out a stress fracture of the heel bone and to see if a bone spur is present that is large enough to cause problems. Other helpful imaging studies include bone scans, MRI, and ultrasound. Ultrasonographic exam may be favored as it is quick, less expensive, and does not expose you to radiation. Laboratory investigation may be necessary in some cases to rule out a systemic illness causing the heel pain, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Reiter's syndrome, or ankylosing spondylitis. These are diseases that affect the entire body but may show up at first as pain in the heel.

Non Surgical Treatment
Treatment for plantar fasciitis should be directed at resting the plantar fascia, providing support for the arch area and limiting pronation. This is often accomplished with the use of supportive strapping with athletic tape, arch supports and orthotics. Heel lifts may also be helpful. Anti-inflammatories, pills as well as cortisone injections, may be effective as an adjunctive treatment by speeding up the reduction of inflammation. However, if used alone, anti-inflammatories rarely lead to resolution of the condition. Stretching exercises, physical therapy and night splints may also be helpful. The majority of cases respond to non-surgical treatment although it may take several weeks to reach a comfortable level. In those cases that do not respond adequately to conservative measures, surgical release of the plantar fascia may be considered. However, a new non-surgical treatment called Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (ESWT) is now available as an option for recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. ESWT was approved by the FDA recently for the treatment of chronic heel pain. It has been in use for several years on thousands of patients in Europe and has been successfully used to restore patients with chronic plantar fasciitis to a normal, active lifestyle. ESWT is a non-invasive procedure that uses high intensity sound waves similar to what is routinely used to treat kidney stones. The treatment is usually performed in the office or in an outpatient surgical center. The procedure is performed under local anesthesia and takes about 25 minutes. The shockwaves are directed at the plantar fascia and stimulate an inflammatory healing response.

Surgical Treatment
When a diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is made early, most patients respond to conservative treatment and don?t require surgical intervention. Often, when there is a secondary diagnosis contributing to your pain, such as an entrapped nerve, and you are non-responsive to conservative care, surgery may be considered. Dr. Talarico will discuss all options and which approach would be the most beneficial for your condition.

Prevention
Painful Heel
Wear properly fitting shoes. Place insoles or inserts in your shoes to help control abnormal foot motion. Maintain a healthy weight. Exercise and do foot stretches as they have been shown to decrease the incidence of heel pain.